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A General Look at Alchemy Part 2 / Page 3
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Dragons

There are many myths and legends concerning heroes slaying dragons that are to be found in the mythology of various cultures. We hear in Greek myth of Apollo vanquishing Python; Siegfried, St. George, Krishna, Hermes, and many other heroic figures have also had their dragons to slay. There are basically two species of dragons to be found in alchemical mythos: the celestial, and the terrestrial dragon. The latter dragon is sometimes called "the red dragon."

What do dragons represent? Dragons are symbols of raw energy within the psycho-biological organism of man. The terrestrial dragon in the microcosm, is the kundalini fire nesting in the kanda. In the average person, this energy is used mainly in sexual gratification and indulgence in sensual activities. Slaying the dragon symbolizes the tapping of this energy for higher uses of the Ego. The student-hero utilizes the sword, symbolic of the will, to overcome the beast within, does so by directing the kundalini fire upwards toward the brain centers via the channel called sushumna--stimulating creativity of a higher order as a result. Illumination is the consequence of the internal marriage that takes place between the negative kundalini force and the higher positive Christic force, symbolised by the celestial dragon, within the Holy of Holies of the sanctum within the cranium. In a symbolical sense, the hero is smeared by dragon's blood making him immortal. The resurrected Kundalini is sometimes represented by the Phoenix bird.

The individual who has his kundalini raised permanently and hissing through the Third Eye, is honorably called a "Naga," a Hindu mystic term for "dragon," or "serpent." With the experience of illumination, the Naga realizes the oneness and unity of life. The Naga is known for his wisdom in his words, action, and behavior. Master Jesus is presumed to have praised the enlightened Nagas by exhorting his followers to be "as wise as a serpent . . ." Dragons, occasionally, represent the unresolved and repressed energies to be found in the psyche--the "monsters of the id"--such as phobias, neurosis, guilt feelings, and the like.

From the geo-terrestrial angle, dragons represent certain currents of magnetic energy found in certain parts of the earth's terrain. They could perhaps be called "chakras of the planet." They also correspond to accupressure points in the body of man. Ley lines are, likewise, associated with geo-terrestrial dragons. The Knights Templers had certain knowledge in this regard--they knew how to determine the locations of magnetically-charged regions. Such hallowed grounds were chosen as sites for cathedrals, chapels, and temples. Dragons are sometimes associated with the body, soul, and spirit of Man.

The Caduceus

Mystic gurus, when instructing disciples, sometimes adopt teaching devices to train their chelas. The Caduceus is one such device. It represents the major nadis, or subtle nervous system to be found in man's occult anatomy.

The Caduceus, or staff of Mercury, is composed of a rod with two snakes intertwined around the rod. The rod represents sushumna, an etheric counterpart of the spinal cord. Within the sushumna there are other subtle nerves, channels of refine energy; they are called by yogis "Vajrini," "Chitrini," and "Brahman." The sushumna extends upwards and outwards into the Overself as the "Sutratma." Pingala and Ida are the two nadis depicted by the snakes. The junctions where the snakes and rod meet are symbolic of the major chakras. Vagabond yogis sometimes carry bamboo staffs with seven knots on it to represent sushumna and the chakras.

Atop of the caduceus rod is a knob; a vine creeper is sometimes attached to this knot ending somewhere midway at the staff. The protuberance represents the medulla oblongata with the vagus nerve, the creeper, connected to it. The vagus nerve ends in the thoracic region. Each of these components plays an important role in man's mystic development. They serve various spiritual functions.

Occasionally, a pair of wings are to be found appended to each side of the knob or rod. This indicates that the kundalini energy at the base of the sushumna had been raised and resurrected. Angelic wings symbolize a superior degree of consciousness and mind.

As a whole, the caduceus symbolizes regeneration and enlightenment. It further depicts the attunement of the mind of man with the Cosmic Mind.

In bygone days, in the Mystery Schools, only the adepts and those of a higher standing were worthy enough to hold such a symbolic staff in their hands. Sometimes the caduceus, or versions of it, were magnetized with odic energy and Atmic force. The Thyrsus held in the hands of hierophants of the Eleusian Mystery School was one rod with such a divine quality impregnated into it. It was primarily designed to stimulate the kundalini fire of the disciples and initiates when their gurus deemed it necessary and appropriate at certain stages of their spiritual growth. The act of impregnating a mystical or religious object with divine influences is called "consecration," or "magnetization."

Some occultists interpret the caduceus as representing the Universal Magickal Agent. This magickal force is used abundantly in theurgic and thaumaturgic operations. Egyptian hierophants were adepts in the application of this force. The laws and principles involved in controlling the agent were transmitted under oath of secrecy to seekers of Light. Appolonius, Pythagoras, and Moses are names that come to mind when considering the display of so-called miracles. These eminent individuals were all initiates of the Mystery schools in the Land of Khem.

Nowadays, the Caduceus is an emblem employed by the medical profession. Only in recent years is this branch of science discovering the subtle energies with which this emblem is silently pointing.

Themes of Alchemy

Alchemy, no matter what its level of application, is essentially psychic in nature. All of the laboratory processes described by alchemists takes place mainly in man's consciousness. Consciousness is the key to transmutation. God-Consciousness is the secret of the royal Art. Functioning in higher dimensions, the conscious mind in unison with higher levels of consciousness, creates forms of perfection in higher realms, in archetypal worlds. The consciousness operating therein coalesces the necessary electronic particles to bring about a manifestation in the physical world. Consciousness, when in the borderline state, easily experiences and produces psychic manifestations.

The Mind is the creator and director of the dynamism and kinetics of subatomic particles. Out of Cosmic Root Substance, or Prima Materia, the Cosmic Mind and Intelligence fashioned the entire universe. Man, being the reflection of the macrocosm, is able to use the same Mind to manifest his designs. Patterns of perfection held constantly in mind becomes living archetypes which stimulates its creator to work spiritually upon his redemption and salvation from bondage to human mortality. We become what we think. Thoughts are living energy, and it is the proper directing of those thoughts by the will that effects transmutation or precipitation. It is declared that thoughts of a divine nature give rise to the vibrations of a Master Soul. Thoughts influence us holistically. Our nerve substances, composition of the blood, auric energies and radiations, are all affected by the state of our mind, by the thoughts that we dwell on a day to day basis.

Every organism is an embryo of a higher development and expression. Nature is constantly striving to produce perfection. Alchemists believe that it is Man's prerogative to speed up the processes of nature to quickly attain perfection. This spiritual labor is conducted in the laboratory of the soul. From the Absolute's point of view, we may speculate that everything is perfect, for "everything" does not truthfully exist--everything is his being. All is God in his omnipresence. God is Immanent and Transcendent. Perfection is a divine quality ever present within Nature and Man. This innate divinity is stressed by spiritual gurus. The "know ye not that ye are gods" precept is emphasized repeatedly. From the relative point of view, imperfections are to be seen everywhere. Man's earthly mission is to transmute this disordered condition, this cacophony of man's evolving principles by attuning with the rhythm of the Cosmos--with the dance of Shiva.

To understand the esoteric science of alchemy, it is necessary to elaborate upon the above through discussing briefly the following alchemical themes:

1) The Philosopher's Stone

2) The First Matter

3) The Seed

4) Mercury--Sulphur--Salt

5) The Seven Metals

6) The Universal Panacea

7) Fire

A General Look at Alchemy Part 3

About the Author
Metaphysical teacher, counseler, healer and merchant of unusual occult/magickal items of Indonesia. More articles may be seen at our sites.
http://www.indotalisman.com/
http://www.bezoarmustikapearls.com/

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